DIY tyre change equipment

Need advice on which oil to use or which tyre best suits you? Share your topic and get help here.
Post Reply
jchesshyre
Posts: 396
Joined: Wed Jun 15, 2016 8:09 am
Location: Chester, Cheshire

DIY tyre change equipment

Post by jchesshyre » Tue Jul 31, 2018 8:14 am

I have decided to bite the bullet and start changing my own tyres. I do all other work on my bikes myself and with the miles I do I'm sick of paying £25 a wheel each time I need a new tyre.

https://abbastands.co.uk/product-detail ... e&pid=38

This seems pretty good value considering what's in it and knowing that their stuff is good quality, and it'd pay for itself after about six tyres, but can anyone recommend some equipment that's any cheaper but still well made and built to last?

User avatar
sirch345
Site Admin
Posts: 17339
Joined: Mon Aug 25, 2003 9:35 pm
Location: Cornwall, UK

Re: DIY tyre change equipment

Post by sirch345 » Tue Jul 31, 2018 9:41 pm

That's only the breaker and wheel balancer in that kit. You need the tyre changer as well, otherwise it's going to be tough work with just tyre levers :)

Chris.
A closed mouth gathers no foot. :thumbup:

haynesjones66
Posts: 105
Joined: Wed Jul 18, 2018 8:44 pm

Re: DIY tyre change equipment

Post by haynesjones66 » Wed Aug 01, 2018 4:09 pm

i'd rather pay the money. i hate changing tyres. i used to change tractor tyres by hand (and bars obviously). absolutely knackering!

User avatar
sirch345
Site Admin
Posts: 17339
Joined: Mon Aug 25, 2003 9:35 pm
Location: Cornwall, UK

Re: DIY tyre change equipment

Post by sirch345 » Wed Aug 01, 2018 7:59 pm

haynesjones66 wrote:
Wed Aug 01, 2018 4:09 pm
i'd rather pay the money. i hate changing tyres. i used to change tractor tyres by hand (and bars obviously). absolutely knackering!
I can imagine changing tractors would be a lot of sweat :)

Changing tyres on a motorcycle was easier before tubeless tyres came on the scene as tubed tyres have more flex in the side walls.
Not that I would want to go back to tubed tyres after suffering a blow-out in the rear tyre two-up on a Triumph 650 pre-unit Thunderbird many, many moons ago.

This is what you want for DIY tyre changing:-

Image

Chris.
A closed mouth gathers no foot. :thumbup:

jchesshyre
Posts: 396
Joined: Wed Jun 15, 2016 8:09 am
Location: Chester, Cheshire

Re: DIY tyre change equipment

Post by jchesshyre » Wed Aug 01, 2018 9:39 pm

Thanks for the advice. Excuse my ignorance but what does the tyre changer do and what makes it hard work with just the bead breaker and tyre levers?

User avatar
KermitLeFrog
Posts: 1301
Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2015 5:44 pm
Location: Hexham

Re: DIY tyre change equipment

Post by KermitLeFrog » Thu Aug 02, 2018 9:12 am

jchesshyre wrote:
Wed Aug 01, 2018 9:39 pm
Thanks for the advice. Excuse my ignorance but what does the tyre changer do and what makes it hard work with just the bead breaker and tyre levers?
It can be very hard work removing and refitting tubeless tyres with just tyre levers.
"I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I squandered" (George Best, RIP)

User avatar
E.Marquez
Posts: 500
Joined: Wed May 30, 2012 12:27 pm

Re: DIY tyre change equipment

Post by E.Marquez » Thu Aug 02, 2018 12:53 pm

I change a LOT of tires .. 90 training bikes, 6 personal bikes, customer bikes in and out of the shop a lot...

Most of those are done with a manual bead beaker and tire stand, 3 levers and a tool called the "Yellow Thing" that holds the bead in place as you lever the new tire on.
If you get a manual breaker or stand, make sure the center hold down fits your wheel axle diameter for the common wheels(tires) you will be changing.

So wheel stand, rim guards (4), 3 levers( at least 2 long ones) a Yellow Thing
AC-YellowThing-5[1].jpg
and spray bottle of tire lube, Dont skimp on the lube :p Not dish soap and water, not the stuff you and the misses use, but tire lube....Its not that much in cost and it works better over home spun make do.

Dynamic Balancing done on a Snap On motorcycle wheel balance I all but stole from a shop that had to upgrade in order to balance the ultra fat rear wheels that come on HD and some metric cruisers. Its an outdated one in today's market, but will handle any wheel I will let in my shop, so works for me.. There are likely deals like this all over as the fat wheel marketing craze continues at least here in the US.

If your not going to dynamically balance them after mounting, and we are talking street bikes, Id say skip the whole thing..Some will say static balancing works good enough, and I suppose, if good enough is ok with you, that's true. Personal I want it done right, the best way possible.

The only tires I wont change right now is on bikes with clean, nice and expensive wheels. The risk to the wheel finish is just too great.
There is one Manual changer I would use on a nice wheel, A company called No Mar https://www.nomartirechanger.com (they sell the "Yellow Thing" )

They have several models of changers and they all work as advertised, and can change a tire on expensive, clean wheels with almost no risk to fit or finish.
The only down side...SPACE you need a large area 360deg around the changer to work the long lever.. I just don't have the space.
So for me it has to be a powered tire changer for nice wheels I cant risk damage to...and i have not found the deal I need yet...Someplace out there is a As new Coats RC200 tire changer
CoatsRC200-2T[1].jpg
CoatsRC200-2T[1].jpg (5.1 KiB) Viewed 348 times
gathering dust and a Ex spouse, ex business partner, disgruntled girlfriend, is wanting to get out of the basement or garage
Marquez Racing
Solutions to recurring maintenance
Race/Adventure ride event prep
Post event services

Total Rider
Your path to a TX motorcycle license
And advanced Rider training

Gnarly
Posts: 17
Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2012 9:49 pm

Re: DIY tyre change equipment

Post by Gnarly » Tue Aug 14, 2018 6:24 pm

The Abba stands bead breaker is good quality but the bead is broken by winding the handle down and back up, the lever type breakers are a bit quicker to use.
The other thing that makes it easier is to heat up the tyres first, I stick tyre warmers on mine before changing them, but leaving them in hot sunshine or a even warm room makes the tyre much more pliable.

Post Reply